Italian ultras

The ultra movement in Italy came into being in the 1950s with the emergence of the first groups to cheer and follow their clubs. The first organized groups emerged during the 1960s.

The first club of fans was organized in Turin in 1951 under the name of Fedelissimi Granata, and he is a shame for all current groups that follow the football club Turin.
The oldest ultra-group is Fossa dei Leoni (Milan) founded in 1968, located in the “curve of the court” of the San Siro stadium, around the so-called. ramps 17. The name “ultras” is first used by Ultras Tito Cucchiaroni, a group founded in 1969 (Sampdoria). A little later, Boys Inter (Inter) was founded, followed by Brigata Giallobl Verona and Viola Club Vieusseux Fiorentina (1971), Ultras Napoli in 1972, Brigate Rossonere Milan, Fosa dei Grifoni Genoa and Ultra Granata Torino in 1973 , all the way to CUCS Roma and Eagles Lazia in 1977. The South was often late in organizing the naval groups for the north. The first groups were organized by the fans of Napolia, Baria, Caglaria and Catanzara, and in the 1980s there were organized clubs of fans of Palermo, Catania, Taranto, Foggie, Cosenza, Messina and others.

In organizational terms, this was a time when fans began to make their own requisites (salons, flags, banners), arrange visits to roaming, to create cheerful songs, choreographies and flares. Their models are from South America, especially Brazilians. The fans of Genoa, Fiorentina and Milan were the first to begin debriefing their stands by using papers, flags and other material for the production of choreography. This was inspiring for many fans outside Italy that they also started with similar activities. There are many things common to fans, and the main distinctive feature is club colors. The use of similar names (leoni, pantera, tigers, commandos, fedelissimi, fedayn, etc.), political markings (Che Guevara, Serbian and cekic, five-pointed star, Celtic cross, etc.) and characters from cartoon and feature films orange, etc.). Ultra cheerleaders have their own stand, which, as a rule, is behind the goal.

The occupation of the opponent's stand was considered to be the greatest success (similar to that in England), which caused many fanatic riots. The first major police use of force occurred in 1974 on the tour of Turin – Sampdoria and Roma – Lazio, when there was an upsurge of fans on the field and mutual account. From that period it is particularly significant on June 28, 1979, when Vicenza Paparelli, a Lazio fan, hit the head of the Roman Olympics with a rocket in her head. Raketu was fired by a fan of Rome – a member of the Fedayn group. This weekend there have been a few more clashing clashes (Ascoli – Bologna Seven injured, Milan – Inter eighteen injured and Bresia – Como several injured). These ragging clashes were condemned by the entire public and the beginning of the police persecution of the fans that continues to this day. The newspaper's headlines were full of fans, mostly in a negative light, but despite all that, the ultra movement was invoked among young Italians and further strengthened during the 1980s when almost every club and in a number of competitions had its own group.


Italian ultras did not follow the national team. The event was the World Cup in Spain in 1982, but this has never happened again because of hatred. Authenticity is one of the main movements of the movements of the movements, so that those years of the racing group of the competition will be more original. The Dorians made the biggest flag (90x32m), the Romanists distributed 10,000 cards in their colors to make the panel look more beautiful, the Napolitans threw hundreds of paper rolls, and so on. Sponsors are also involved in the development of navy props (Brigates Giallobl Verona have a flag of Canon, Boys Inter advertise Cattel borse, etc.). This practice is abandoned because it does not fit into the so-called. “mentalita ultra”.

During the 1980s, rioting does not erupt, and often have fatal consequences: in 1984, Trieste's striker, Stefano Furlan, was killed in Trieste and Udinese. That same year, at the duel of Milan and Cremonese, Marco Fonghessi, a young man named Giovanni Centrone, was killed. The ultra-motion is highly spun. For example. In 1988, Fosa dei Leoni had about 40,000 members. At the beginning of the 90s, ultra-movement became fashionable, and ultras after 30 years became equal participants in Calcia. They are often called the 12th player, and individuals, such as Palummel – the water of Napoli's fans, become celebrities throughout the country. Vicenzo Spagnolo, a Genoa fan, was killed in 1995 at the match of Milan and Genoa, which again triggers the avalanche of public condemnation, but also a larger part of the ultras. It raises the pressure against the police by the police. Italian naval groups united to fight the so-called “pay-television” and the way the Italian football championship is developing. The inevitability of the break-up of certain groups of fans (Brigata giallobl Verona, Fosa dei Grifoni Genoa, CUCS Roma and others) is inevitable. Modern Italian fan clubs are well-organized, have a large number of members, self-financed by selling props and paying fees. The main activity is the production of choreographies, flags, banners, flag on two sticks, organization of flags and others. In response to police persecution, the so-called “casual” fans who go on tour with no visible navy badges.


For the Italian navy scene, there are characteristic political divisions for left-wingers, right-wingers and non-politicians. The left-hand players include the following clubs: Albinoleffe, Ancona, Brescia, Campobasso, Carrarese, Casertana, Cosenza, Empoli, Livnorno, Milan, Modena, Paterno, Parma (part), Perugia, Pisa, Pistoiese, Teramo, Ternana, Venezia. The right-wingers are Ascoli, Avellino, Bologna, Mods, Cagliari (former Furios), Catania, Catanzaro, Chieti, Como, Fermana, Foggia, Frosinone, Inter, Lazio, Lecco, Licata (Gioventi Sconvolta), Lodigiani , Milazzo, Monopoli, Napoli (Curva A), Olbia, Padova, Palermo, Parma (some), Perugia (Brigata Ultra), Piacenza, Potenza, Pro Patria, Pro Sesto, Reggina, Roma, SalernoSiracusa, Terracina, Treviso Triestina, Udinese , Varese, Verona Hellas. Other fan groups, such as the fans of Sampdoria, Turin, Juventus, Genoa, are not politically defined.

Choreographies become more and more spectacular.There is also the dressing of the Ultras. The dresses are dressed in the military phase, now the files, t-shirts and duks are dominated by the group. Selling the material as well as halls are financed by the activities of the group. The most important thing in the whole story is that the end In the 1980s, the violence of the 1980s experienced an expansion in the Italian-style movement. On October 1988, Ascoli-Inter was killed by a cheerleader who died as a result of a beating. In May 1988, the Ultrasi Sampdoria and Genoa were beaten all the way until the police separated them using On that occasion, automatic weapons. The same year. one Romanist was murdered in Milan, and a week later, Ultras Fiorentine threw a Molotov cocktail on the train with fans of Bologna. One Bolognese was seriously injured. In the 1920s, many changes took place in Italian stadiums caused by the World Cup. In all stadiums, sectors for visiting fans who, in most cases, can receive between 1000-1500 views. This method proved to be ineffective because when a group traveled in more than the number of places in the police sectors, they let them go to the neighboring sectors where the domestic audience was located. Prices the cards ranged from 25-30 000l (twice more than the cinema or discotheque entrance) that made many fans stay home. In the meantime, special trains were abolished due to large losses. The trucks therefore started using the buses that created it the possibility of conflicts on highways, because every week thousands and thousands of ultras travel and often meet on highways. There are also choreographies that have begun to emerge from the fashion. Many groups have begun to prefer a different style of cheering that resembles English with many small banners, little flashes and smokes, and the use of multicolored halls instead of those with the name of the group. Some of the historical groups like Brigate Giallo Blu-verona and eagles Suporters-Lazio broke up due to police repression. The defense of the violence from many ultra-leaders were arrested and were banned from arriving at the stadium. In fact, they had to come to the police station every time their club played a game .

Among the Ultras groups in the mid-1980s, there was a sort of competition in the quality and originality of the navy props. For example, Napoli's fans in each game helped their team punctuate all their strength in 120 big drums. The Fiorentini were proud of the modest 60, who supported 40 car horns and countless trumpets and pistols. This was definitely the biggest gamers in Italian stadiums.
Interesting is the political coloration of the Ultras Group. The political orientation of the party has grown and ranged from the fascist, republican, to the ultimate leftist form.
Regardless of the fact that they do not play in the same ranking, there is a lot of hostility among the fans of Perudje and Ternane. The main reason is that these teams are from the same province
After the successful action of Perudjana when Freak Brothers stole several banners, the Terni guys came up with a hell of a plan. During the return of Perudjian from a single tour, Freak Brothers held them on the bridge over the highway and threw a few booms on them. to a traffic accident in which there were also the severely injured ones.
The very word ultras in translation means the ultimate – in this case it should mean “special” and unusual fans. In contrast, they are “ordinary” typhoids, calm, passive observers.
In essence, violence was reduced numerically, but the incidents that were happening had become more and more difficult.
In the season 94/95 before the game Djenova-Milan one Djenova's cheerleader succumbed to injuries because before the game stabbed a knife.

The fans of Genoa tried to get revenge, so the police had to give Milanista a 10 hours at the stadium. After this accident, a group of heads of all groups was made. The arrangement did not come as the situation remained unchanged.
It can be said that there are not many innovations lately between the Italian ultras. There were a lot of friendships with foreign groups and the overall cheerleading quality has dropped drastically. Currently, it is most interesting in C series matches where the groups have more freedom to play and perform more and more. ………

Years of establishment of fan groups in Italy:

FEDELISSIMI TORINO 1951
VIESSEUX FIORENTINA 1965
SETTEBELLO FIORENTINA 1965
BOYS SAN INTER 1969
ULTRAS TITO CUCHIARONI DORIA 1969
ULTRAS GRANATA TORINO 1969
COMMANDOS TIGRE MILAN 1969
CLUB OTTAVIO BARBIERI GENOA 1970
FEDAYN ROMA1972
BOYS ROMA 1972
BRIGATE GIALOBLU MODENA 1972
ULTRAS CATANAZARO 1973
FEDELISSIMI MESSINA 1973
FOREVER ULTRAS BOLOGNA 1974
SETTEMBRE BIANCONERO ASCOLI 1974
FREAK BROTHERS TERNANA 1974
ULTRAS SPEZIA 1974
BRIGATE ROSSONERE MILAN 1975
ULTRAS BARI CURVA NORD 1976
RANGERS PESCARA 1976
VIGILANTES VICENZA 1976
RANGERS EMPOLI 1976
ULTRAS TRIESTE 1976
BOYS PARMA 1977
GRANATA SOUTH FORCE SALERNITANA 1977
ONDA D'URTO SAMB 1977
COLLETTIVO AUTONOMO VIOLA FIORENTINA 1978
ARMATA ROSSA PERUGIA 1978
GREEN STARS AVELINO 1978
FEDAYN NAPOLI 1979
ULTRAS FIGHTERS SIENA 1979
FALANGE D'ASSALTO CATANIA1979
RANGERS PISA 1979
GIOVENTU GIALLOROSSO MESSINA 1980
BRIGATE ROSANERO PALERMO 1980
WARRIORS ULTRA PALERMO 1980
REGIME ROSSONERO FOGGIA 1980
WEISSCHARZ BRIGADEN CESSENA 1981
GRANATA KORPS TORINO 1981
TEDDY BOYS UDINESE 1981
CUCN REGINA 1982
FALANGE D'ASSALTO RIMINI 1982
NOCS MESSINA 1983
DESPERADOS EMPOLI 1983
SCONVOLTS PISA 1984
BOYS REGINA 1986
IRRIDUCIBILI LAZIO 1987
SECOND JUVENTUS 1987
SCONVOLTS CAGLIARI 1987
ULTRAS UNIONE VENEZIA 1987
VIRGILIANS KAOS MANTOVA 1987
CRUELS AVELINO 1988